Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward

Walking the hallowed grounds of Arlington National Cemetery, I yearned for the assurance that we will move forward as a nation toward peace.

Arlington National Cemetery

The wars throughout America’s history have shaped the thoughts and aspirations of generations, and touched the lives of millions around the world.

U.S. National World War II Memorial
U.S. National World War II Memorial

The monuments in our nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., often memorialize or reflect upon war.  Their words and images ran through my mind as we walked the rolling hills of the cemetery.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Korean War Veterans Memorial
Korean War Veterans Memorial
Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Vietnam Veterans Memorial

While Arlington National Cemetery also contains the graves of notable American heroes or other people of influential significance, unrelated to any military conflict, I could only think of the sorrow that war brings as I surveyed row after row of white marble markers.

Arlington National Cemetery

The old trees cradled some markers in their gnarled roots, while their broad canopies kept watch over others.  Each marker had a story to tell — a life cut short, a life of love, a life of loss.

Arlington National Cemetery

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier ~ Arlington National Cemetery
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier ~ Arlington National Cemetery

Some markers were left without names, a particularly poignant reminder of the stories some never lived to tell.

Arlington National Cemetery

When promising lives are cut short, so often you hear, “let them not die in vain.”  Tragic circumstances often compel people to come together and move forward in a concerted effort to create a better tomorrow.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

Just as Martin Luther King, Jr. looked forward with hope during the darkest of days, so must we.  As we reflect upon our history, we carry hope forward, seeking wisdom from the often costly mistakes and tragic experiences of our past.

Arlington National Cemetery

Ciao! ~ Kat

This post was in response to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge.  ”Forward” was this week’s theme.  Everyone is welcome to join in the Challenge; further details on how to participate and links to others’ responses are found here.

29 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward

  1. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward | Flickr Comments

      1. I know I have been there and it just makes me have a feeling for our country that is so strong. There are many brave souls buried in that cemetery. My husband took some photos from his trip in October,but yours are more close up and give life to the subject…Great work.

        Like

  2. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward (5) and Travel Theme: Bridges (1) Istanbul | What's (in) the picture?

  3. Beautiful photos. Reminds me of one of my favorite quotes by (I believe) Jonathan Larson, from the musical Rent: “The opposite of war isn’t peace, it’s creation. ”

    Of course, living together peacefully is extremely important, but I always thought this quote, just like your photos, really communicates how detrimental war is. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  4. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward | Kerry Dwyer

  5. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward (6 Sightseeing) | What's (in) the picture?

  6. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward (7 Roller Skates in Paris) | What's (in) the picture?

  7. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward | paul dear photography

  8. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Forward (8 Skateboard) | What's (in) the picture?

  9. Thank you for this post. I attended a burial at Arlington – one of my son’s fellow Marines – far, far too many markers are sitting there. It’s overwhelming. Can we move forward in this way?

    Like

    1. Thank you so much for commenting, bluebrightly — I cannot imagine the emotions multiplied through attendance at a burial for a cherished family member or friend taken far before their time. ~ Kat

      Like

  10. Visiting these sites is a very moving experience. We visited a Canadian war cemetery near the beaches of Normandy where so many died on D-Day – in most cemeteries the dates of death vary but that day it was row after row of June 6, June 6, June 6 …

    Like

Share your thoughts ~ I may not reply to every comment, but know that your comment is appreciated!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s